Family Business Recommends

Our publishers and editors have hand selected the following books for you to consider adding to your library. Happy reading.

The Three Little Pigs Learn to Give, Save, and Spend

The Big Bad Wolf is back, and he's blowing down houses in the forest, one by one. The Three Little Pigs hatch a plan to help other animals weather the wolf's mighty lungs. They start a building company, offering strong homes built of brick, just like theirs. Demand is high for the brick homes the Pigs build, and their business becomes a success. Now they need to figure out what they should do with their hard-earned profits. One little Pig wants to spend away, another wants to give it away, and the third wants to save it. Based on the give-save-spend-concept, this sequel to the classic fairy tale teaches kids a safe and practical approach to managing money.

Schools don't teach basic finance, and most books about money are too confusing for younger children. An entertaining first step in any child's education, Give, Save, Spend with the Three Little Pigs is easy to read and understand.

How do individuals get trapped in their family business? What does it look like when someone is trapped? Is exiting the only option? Based on interviews with family business members, owners, and their advisors, Trapped in the Family Business sheds light on this common yet unexplored issue and offers solutions for how to manage it. In the expanded second edition to this practical guide, Dr. Michael Klein shares research findings, insights, and how to avoid this challenging and complex situation.

Emily Griffiths-Hamilton

From mom-and-pop stores to Fortune 500 corporations, the family business as an institution is widespread and enduring―yet only 30 percent of family enterprises successfully transition to the next generation. In this accessible and deeply informed new book, family enterprise expert Emily Griffiths-Hamilton (author of Build Your Family Bank: A Winning Vision for Multigenerational Wealth) shares the secrets of successful multigenerational family enterprises.

Through extensive research and personal and professional experience as a member of and advisor to family enterprises, Griffiths-Hamilton has developed an unconventional approach that looks beyond narrow business considerations to focus on the critical aspect of every family enterprise―the “family factor.” Successful multi-generational family enterprises, she explains, are animated by a unifying vision that rests on shared values. Mutual trust and strong communication skills are vital for families to articulate these foundational elements, which will then inform a “family enterprise framework” that can endure for generations.

Planning for the long-term health of a family business doesn’t need to be complicated. Beginning with a single meeting, family enterprises of every shape and size can use the insights in this book to build robust frameworks that will reward their members for decades to come―not just financially, but with strengthened family connections, a shared sense of purpose, and perhaps most importantly, a bit of fun.

William Handwerker

"Nathan’s Famous: The First 100 Years of America’s Favorite Frankfurter Company" chronicles the history and business strategies of company founder Nathan Handwerker that led to the success of an iconic international brand and two of America’s most loved foods: The Nathan’s Famous Frankfurter and Crinkle-cut French Fries. 

Adam Bellow

Nepotism is one of those social habits we all claim to deplore in America; it offends our sense of fair play and our pride in living in a meritocracy. But somehow nepotism prevails; we all want to help our own and a quick glance around reveals any number of successful families whose sons and daughters have gone on to accomplish objectively great things, even if they got a little help from their parents.